Boca man becomes ill after Rx mix up

Posted by Rachel Leigh - email

BOCA RATON, FL (WFLX) - A Boca Raton couple gives us all a reminder just how important it is to double check your prescription medications before you take them.

Bob Rosenbleeth became very ill after, he says, a Walgreens gave him the wrong medication. Now, he and his wife, Cheryl, want to know how this happened and that it won't happen to anyone else, but, they claim, Walgreens is giving them the runaround.

"I have rheumatoid arthritis; I have osteo arthritis. It's crippling." It effects everything Bob Rosenbleeth does. To get through the day with his bad back, he needs the pain medication hydrocodone, also known as Vicodin. But something happened last year after taking his normal dose. "All of the sudden, I got real sick from it, and it never happened before."

He had flu like symptoms for days, so he and Cheryl decided to take a closer look at his medication. That's when they realized several of the pills in the bottle were slightly different in size and shape. Along with his Hydrocodone, Bob also received a drug called Metformin. It lowers high blood sugar for diabetics. That's what the Rosenbleeths say made Bob so ill.

"Was it just a slip of these two different things being done together and the pills got mixed or is there something different going on with Agree's with this pill that he takes," Cheryl Rosenbleeth said.

She has tried for more than a year to find that out. She's e-mail and called the Walgreens numerous times for answers. But -- "Anything I request, I get told, 'No' or they just ignore the request all together."

We spoke with a Walgreens manager at the West Boca Raton location near Glades Road and 441 where the prescription was filled. They referred us to a corporate spokesperson who told us:

"Cases like this are rare, and we take them very seriously. We have a multi-step prescription filling process with numerous safety checks in each step to reduce the chance of human error. No company has invested more in pharmacy safety initiatives, training and technology. Any time a claim like this is made, we investigate it to better understand what happened and to prevent it from happening again."

But for Bob and Cheryl, it's too late. They now will only use a locally owned pharmacy, and they are still waiting for the results of that investigation.

The Rosenbleeth's say they used the Web site Drugs.com to find out what the wrong medication is.