WATCH LIVE: Sessions Confirmation Hearing - Fox29 WFLX TV, West Palm Beach, FL-news & weather

WATCH LIVE: Sessions Confirmation Hearing

  • Fox 29 Daily HeadlinesMore>>

  • Shiffrin gets silver in Vonn's last Olympic race; Gisin wins

    Shiffrin gets silver in Vonn's last Olympic race; Gisin wins

    Wednesday, February 21 2018 11:37 PM EST2018-02-22 04:37:26 GMT
    Friday, February 23 2018 12:36 AM EST2018-02-23 05:36:48 GMT
    (AP Photo/Christophe Ena). United States' Lindsey Vonn comes to a stop in the finish area of the women's combined downhill at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Jeongseon, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018.(AP Photo/Christophe Ena). United States' Lindsey Vonn comes to a stop in the finish area of the women's combined downhill at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Jeongseon, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018.

    Lindsey Vonn, the leader after the downhill portion, made a mistake early in the slalom and didn't finish in what's likely the final race of her Winter Games career.

    More >>

    Lindsey Vonn, the leader after the downhill portion, made a mistake early in the slalom and didn't finish in what's likely the final race of her Winter Games career.

    More >>
  • Trump says raise age for buying assault rifles, defying NRA

    Trump says raise age for buying assault rifles, defying NRA

    Thursday, February 22 2018 12:24 AM EST2018-02-22 05:24:41 GMT
    Friday, February 23 2018 12:35 AM EST2018-02-23 05:35:37 GMT
    (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster). President Donald Trump, looks to Julia Cordover, the student body president at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., as she speaks during the listening session with high school students, teachers, and others...(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster). President Donald Trump, looks to Julia Cordover, the student body president at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., as she speaks during the listening session with high school students, teachers, and others...

    Students and parents appealed to President Donald Trump to set politics aside and protect America's school children from the scourge of gun violence.

    More >>

    Students and parents appealed to President Donald Trump to set politics aside and protect America's school children from the scourge of gun violence.

    More >>
  • Drink up: Thursday is National Margarita Day

    Drink up: Thursday is National Margarita Day

    Thursday, February 22 2018 8:36 AM EST2018-02-22 13:36:42 GMT

    The origins of the celebration are not known, but it is celebrated annually on Feb. 22.

    More >>

    The origins of the celebration are not known, but it is celebrated annually on Feb. 22.

    More >>

 WASHINGTON (AP) -- Sen. Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump's pick for attorney general, will outline his conservative priorities for the Justice Department as his confirmation hearings open Tuesday. He faces a tougher task in persuading skeptical Democrats he'll be fair and committed to civil rights as the country's top law enforcement official.

"The office of the Attorney General of the United States is not a political position, and anyone who holds it must have total fidelity to the laws and the Constitution of the United States," Sessions said in prepared testimony that also outlines goals of beefed-up drug, gun and immigration enforcement.

Sessions also said he understands "the history of civil rights and the horrendous impact that relentless and systemic discrimination and the denial of voting rights has had on our African-American brothers and sisters. I have witnessed it."

Democrats are expected to use the two days of hearings to challenge Sessions' commitment to civil rights, a chief priority of the Justice Department during the Obama administration. They also are likely to press him on his hard-line stance on immigration policy. But Republicans have expressed strong support and are expected to secure more than enough votes needed to confirm him, including from some Democrats in conservative-leaning states.

The Alabama lawmaker is known as one of the most staunchly conservative members of the Senate, and has already drawn opposition from at least two Democrats, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown.

In a dramatic turn, Booker - one of three black senators - said he will testify against Sessions on Wednesday, marking a rare instance in which a senator has testified against a colleague seeking a Cabinet post. In a statement, Booker accused Sessions of having a "concerning" record on civil rights and criminal justice reform and called his decision "a call to conscience."

If confirmed, the four-term senator would succeed outgoing Attorney General Loretta Lynch and would be in a position to dramatically reshape Justice Department priorities in the areas of civil rights, environmental enforcement and criminal justice.

Sessions was first elected to the Senate in 1996 and before that served as state attorney general and a United States attorney. He's been a reliably conservative voice in Congress, supporting government surveillance programs, objecting to the proposed closure of the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, detention facility and opposing as too lenient a 2013 bipartisan immigration bill that included a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

He will look to turn the page from a failed confirmation hearing in 1986, when his nomination for a federal judgeship was derailed by accusations he had made racially insensitive comments as a federal prosecutor.

Civil rights advocates have rallied against his nomination, with protesters staging a sit-in last week at a Sessions office in Alabama and circulating letters opposed to his nomination. Advocacy groups have drawn attention to positions from Sessions they fear could weaken legal protections for immigrants, minority voters and gays, lesbians and transgender people.

Sessions' supporters have pointed to bipartisan work in the Senate and to supportive statements from some Democrats and even the son of a civil rights activist whom Sessions unsuccessfully prosecuted for voter fraud in Alabama. One of the two senators introducing him at Tuesday's hearing is a moderate Republican, Susan Collins of Maine, suggesting a concerted effort to try to cement his appeal beyond the more conservative members.

Sessions may be asked whether the Justice Department would investigate again Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while she was secretary of state. Trump said during the campaign that he would ask his attorney general to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate Clinton, but suggested after he won that he had changed his mind.

Witnesses on Wednesday include former Attorney General Michael Mukasey, NAACP President Cornell Brooks and David Cole, the legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Associated Press 2017

Powered by Frankly

1100 Banyan Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401

FCC Public File
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2018 Raycom Media. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.