Home is where the heart is (and office, restaurant, school, work)

Home is where the heart is (and office, restaurant, school, work)

"When COVID hit, it really made people think," Joseph Tralongo, the design director at Leeds Custom Design, said. "There's definitely a deeper assessment of what their needs were. It was interesting because I never got so much feedback on projects ever as I have in the last six or seven months."

Tralongo said there is now different thinking that goes into development of spaces.

"We're going to be designing this way for a while," he said.

The focus now points to the kitchen, with more people at home cooking. Plus, the need and design of home offices is changing.

"I just got a request for, like, a Zoom station," he said. "There's going to be a work station everywhere."

Danielle Lawler, a Realtor with Illustrated Properties, said there is also a struggle for space without enough walls. It's a challenge when families are living, schooling and working together.

"What our homes have trended toward in the last few years are very open concept spaces, and so people are looking for homes that still have that general open concept, but just more space where they can repurpose some rooms to be that home office, to be that gym or a space for their children to do their virtual learning," she said.

Lawler said potential buyers all seem to tell her the same thing.

"No matter the buyer, age or profession, if they have kids or no kids, everyone wants more space," she said. "We have more people living under the same roof."

Lawler said another common request these days is the need for a "mudroom" during a pandemic.

"If you want to have a clean space inside your home, you have a dedicated area where you have your dirty items," she said.

Scripps Only Content 2020